Friday, December 14, 2012

Scratch-built Buildings Part 6

See earlier post (part 5).

I got around to flocking the foundation boards for each of the buildings with a little help from my daughter.  She's very good at this skill and keeps the amount of wastage for glue and flock grass to a minimum.

So here's what I've got; a series of pictures showing each building from different angles and then a shot of each foundation by itself at the bottom of this series.  I've added some minis for scale reference.

The next part in this series I'll show the interiors.  I'm currently working to paint them and I have another tutorial on how to scratch-build interior doors that I'll provide as well.

Small Building A - Just Old


The easement.

The brownstone was my daughter's idea.
I think it came out nice.

Just preaching that death and destruction
just in case any of the Old Ones are listening.
The far corner.

Small Building B - Squatter's House



Our tireless model never fails to break
out a good smoke at the first opportunity
to pose in front of an old building.

The foundation is a wee bit small but its
still good enough for game-play.

"ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn!"
per se

The chimney side of the building.  Ack.

Large Building A - The Nice One

Another door, another smoke break.

I designed each building to have a
unique 'character'.  This one has mostly
a good paint job and lots of green stuff.

Approaching the north door.

The railing in this one was a bit involved.
I'm thinking future efforts I'll use ShapeWays.

Completing the tour.  The house is immaculate.

Large Building B - The Legacy Fire


The main entry is burnt out, boarded-up, and over-grown.
Doesn't stop Elder McElder from reading a nice book.

Approaching the south wall.

Turning that corner to see the back of the building.

There's Deacon McDeacon with another cig.

Coming around back to the front; this
is the north wall near where the fire
had been.  Tsk. Tsk.


The Foundation Boards


The floor here was etched with an awl.

This is cork-board.  I added a layer of glue to seal it.

Plain poster-board with about four different coats
of dry-brushed paint.


The brownstone wall compliments the
hand-etched checker pattern.  The colors are
all courtesy of my daughter.